Next contact-free deliveries Oct. 20 and 21, plus updates from around the farm


As I go about my routine on the farm, I see signs of the rapidly changing seasons all around me. My maple trees are almost bare, but the tulip poplars are starting to turn yellow, my sassafras and dogwoods are in various shades of red and green, and the beeches are just starting to show the first hints of yellow and gold. The trees are also alive with fall warblers and other migrating bird species hopping around and gleaning any insects, seeds, and fruit that they find.

One of the honey bees on the farm working some of our last goldenrod. Those tattered wings are proof that this isn’t her first foraging trip. Photo credit: Shannon Trimboli, all rights reserved

In the fields, most of the goldenrod has gone to seed, but there are still a few patches in bloom. The yellow wingstem is also still blooming and I have drifts of white asters that look like piles of snow. My yard is also pink with smartweed flowers. The honey bees and bumble bees are busily working all the flowers they can find. I’m also seeing an increase in cloudless sulphur butterflies as they migrate south for the winter.

I only have approximately 20 jars of honey left for sale from my 2020 harvest. If you want any (including if you want to stock up), please let me know. Once these 20 jars are gone, it’ll be next summer before I have more honey for sale.

The ducks have also decided that it is time to slow down and take a break. I’m only getting one or two eggs a day, so unfortunately don’t have any eggs for sale this time. It may be March before I have duck eggs available again. I’ll keep you updated.

The nursery has been officially put to bed for the season. I’m currently gathering seeds and making plans for next year. I’ve even already planted two species that I am going to try germinating outside because I haven’t had any luck with getting them to germinate inside. Another species I hope to offer has a complicated germination cycle that often requires it to go through a winter, a summer, and another winter before it will germinate.

I only have approximately 20 jars of honey left for sale from my 2020 harvest. If you want any (including if you want to stock up), please let me know. Once these 20 jars are gone, it’ll be next summer before I have more honey for sale.

I’m trying to artificially replicate that cycle and speed it up a bit so I can have this species available next year. I’ve started the process and we’ll see how it goes. I may also plant some of the seeds outside and let them go through the natural cycle as a backup. There’s a reason why you don’t find some species for sale very often, even from native plant nurseries. Many species are just too complicated to germinate or take too long to grow to make them economically viable, especially at a large scale. I like a challenge though and so have fun playing with a few of these complicated species each year.

My next contact-free deliveries will be Tuesday, Oct. 20 (Bowling Green) and Wednesday, Oct. 21 (Glasgow). Since the only thing I have available right now is honey ($12 for a 13 oz glass jar), I’m not going to make a pdf order form. Just send me an email with how many jars you want and whether you want to pick it up in Bowling Green or Glasgow. More details about how the contact-free deliveries work can be found at https://shannontrimboli.com/contact-free-deliveries/. The deadline to place an order for this round of contact-free deliveries is 8:00 a.m., Monday, Oct. 19. Let me know if you have any questions.

Have a great day!
Shannon

P.S. In Nov. I will be offering an online class on planting for honey bees. The class will be aimed at beekeepers, but non-beekeepers may also find it interesting. Details about the class will be posted to my website and Facebook page either late this week or early next week.


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2 thoughts on “Next contact-free deliveries Oct. 20 and 21, plus updates from around the farm

  • John Daugherty

    Though I am in the very southern portion of Northern Kentucky (Owen County) and thus have a slightly different environment, I am thrilled to have found your site. Very good information as I have been interested in starting a bee colony for a few years now. Thanks for your hard work and generous sharing of your results and knowledge.

    • Shannon Trimboli Post author

      Hi John,
      Thanks for the kind comments. I’m glad you are enjoying my site. Yes, you have a slightly different environment, but also lots of similarities. Good luck on your beekeeping journey. Let me know if you have any questions that I might be able to help you with.

      Have a great day!
      Shannon